Association Between Lean Mass and Handgrip Strength With BoneMineral Density in Physically Active Postmenopausal Women

Public in Journal of Clinical Densitometry: Assessment of Skeletal Health, vol. 13, no. 1, 96e101, 2010. Written by Rosangela Villa Marin, Marcia Alessandra Carneiro Pedrosa, Linda Denise Fernandes Moreira Pfrimer, Sandra Marcela Mahecha Matsudo and Marise Lazaretti Castro


The present study evaluated 117 physically active postmenopausal women (67.8 7.0 yr) who performed neuro-motor physical tests (strength, balance, and mobility). Body composition (lean mass [g], fat mass [g]and % fat) and bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar spine (L1eL4), femoral neck, and total body were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Following the World Health Organization criteria, osteoporosis was found in at least 1 analyzed site in 33 volunteers (28.2%): 30 (25.6%) in lumbar spine and 9 (7.7%) in femoral neck. Body weight was strongly and positively related to BMD in all sites, but the most important component of body composition was lean mass, also significantly related to all BMD sites, whereas fat mass was weakly related to the femoral neck BMD. Percent fat did not correlate with any BMD site. Of all the physical tests, the handgrip strength was most importantly related to lumbar spine, femoral neck, and total body (r 5 0.49, p ! 0.001; r 5 0.56, p ! 0.001; and r 5 0.52, p ! 0.001, respectively). The static body balance presented a weak but significant positive correlation only with lumbar spine. Our results suggest that strategies aiming to improve muscle strength and lean mass must contribute to the bone health of physically active postmenopausal women.

Key Words: Bone mineral density; handgrip strength; lean mass; physically active; postmenopausal women.

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